Spoonful

I don’t have a long story to tell this time.

I’m going to let the pictures do the talking with the exception of one observation here, and a bit of really good news at the end.

The observation is this: Every millimeter of extra wood on this roughed out project requires more time to remove than you can possibly imagine. However, with the tools and skills that are available to me, this is as close as I could get it before the possibility of catastrophic wood splitting became a real problem.

We begin here:

I kept my printed out spoon pattern nearby for encouragement.

Looks like a chipmunk has been playing on my kitchen table.

Hours later. . .

One more just because….

I learned many things. The most important of which is that I have to find a way to remove that extra wood safely and efficiently. Also, I need to do some research on how to paint the handle. I HAVE to paint it like the original I saw. I just love that part!

Here’s where the really good news comes in. There is a woodworker in town that I had consulted at the beginning of this saga, who offered to help me out by cutting out my ‘spoon blanks’ as they are called, with his band saw. A few weeks ago I called and left a message that I would like to take him up on his offer. Well, days and days went by with no response and not wanting to be a pest, I went the other route with the drill and cobbled together spoon vise.

Today, when I was taking one of my many breaks from carving to rest my hands, he returned my call!

Turns out the poor man was in a car accident and is recovering from a shoulder injury! 🙁 His offer of helping me out still stands!!!! We had a long conversation about tools and supplies and all other things wood carving.

We made an appointment next week and he said he could cut out lots of spoon blanks for me because it only takes a few minutes on the band saw.

So now I need to get busy and draw a bunch of spoon patterns that I want to try on my wood. Now that I have finished this spoon, I’ll spend all my time on Pinterest printing out patterns to trace.

And also resting my hands.

They be tired.

But they be happy.